WHAT ARE ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS?

EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and DPA (docosapentaenoic acid) are omega-3 essential fatty acid found in seal oil. Fish oil only contains EPA and DHA.  Although DPA, EPA and DHA work together to ensure the proper functioning of the human body, scientific research has shown that each of these fatty acids have unique advantages.

10 X MORE EFFICIENT

Repairing damaged vessels

A scientific study has shown that the maximal stimulation of endothelial cell migration by DPA pre-treatment was achieved using only 1/10 of the required EPA concentration.

These data suggest that the effect of EPA on endothelial cell migration occurs via DPA, and that DPA plays an important role in repairing damaged vessels.

OPTIMIZES OMEGA-3 INTAKE

Absorption of epa and dha

A study conducted in 2010 has shown that the beneficial effects of seal oil supplementation were superior to those of fish oil.  The two types of oil used for the experiment contained a similar amount of Omega-3. However, the fish oil was containing much more DHA, less EPA and a very small amount of DPA.  After 14 days of supplementation, the total level of Omega-3 in healthy subjects increased by 41% for the those eating fish oil and 63% for those consuming seal oil.  The results of this study suggest that DPA, either directly or through retro conversion through EPA, may be more effective in increasing the levels of Omega-3 in human body.

BOOSTS ALL KEY OMEGA-3’s : DPA, EPA & DHA

Molecule

The models of absorption for DPA and EPA are quite distinct. A study published in the European Journal of Nutrition in 2013 shows that in just 14 days of supplementation, DPA has increased the proportions of EPA (by 3.1 times), the proportions of DHA (by 3.1 times ) and the proportions of DPA (by 2.3 times) in the triglycerides. The study also showed that unlike DPA, EPA did not alter the proportions of DPA and DHA in any lipid fraction. 

Cardiovascular health

Cardiovascular Health

Numerous large-scale epidemiological studies suggest that people at risk for coronary artery disease can benefit from an omega-3 supplementation. The benefits of EPA and DHA on the cardiovascular system led the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to allow a health claim linking the consumption of EPA and DHA to a reduced risk of coronary heart disease. It is recommended that people who have survived a myocardial infarction should consume about 1g per day of EPA and DHA for cardio protection purposes. The mechanism by which omega-3 fatty acids reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease is still under study. [lii]

Reduces joint inflammation

In joint and muscle tissue, EPA naturally supports healthy inflammatory levels. According to the results of a scientific study, it was recommended that patients with arthritis consume 3 to 6 g per day of dietary supplements containing n-3 fatty acids for more than 12 weeks. Supplements should not replace standard therapeutic medical treatment, but should instead be added to it. After taking omega-3 supplements for 3-4 months, patients may try to reduce their dose of medication under the supervision of a doctor. However, it is important to note that there are many forms of arthritis and that clinical studies demonstrating the efficacy of Omega-3 have been performed only in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.[liii]

Reduces joint inflammation
Brain boosting

Brain boosting

A study published in the Journal of Nutrition reported a correlation between higher levels of DHA and improved cognitive performance in middle-aged adults. [liv] Several other scientific studies have shown that people who consume more DHA in their lifetime have better cognitive function as they age.

Pregnancy and breast feeding benefits

DHA is essential in the development of the brain, eyes and nerves during pregnancy and the first years of child’s life. However, pregnant women who eat raw or partially cooked fish are at risk of developing a food-borne illness, such as listeriosis. A high quality Omega-3 oil is therefore an ideal solution and is safe for pregnant women. Canada has established specific standards for all natural health products, including fish oils and marine oils. Some research have shown that mothers who consume Omega-3 have a smooth labor experience and keeps a good morale after giving birth. In addition, the child has a better immune system and performs better in a variety of tests. [lv] [lvi] [lvii]

Pregnancy
Combat Mood disorders

Combat mood disorders

Since Omega-3 levels are highly concentrated in the brain, they have a significant impact on mental health. Sixty percent (60%) of our brain is fat and DHA alone accounts for about 20 percent (20%) of the cerebral cortex. [lviii] The results of a scientific study suggest that during depression, there is an abnormal metabolism of omega-3 in our brain. [lix] This is why a DHA supplementation can have a beneficial effect since we depend on our diet to get the necessary Omega-3 fatty acids in order to improve and protect our brain function.

OTHER OMEGA-3 BENEFITS

CARDIOVASCULAR INFLAMMATORY/ JOINTS BRAIN
  • Heart attack
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Stroke
  • Cholesterol
  • Hypertension
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Reduces triglyceride levels
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus
  • Inflammation
  • Alzheimer
  • Cognitive decline
  • Mood & anxiety
  • Depression
  • Concentration
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
 PREGNANCY/INFANT DEVELOPMENT  CANCER  OTHERS
  • Pregnancy
  • Breast feeding
  • Immune system of the baby
  • Postnatal health
  • Language
  • Learning
  • Prostate health
  • Colon health
  • Breast health
  • Lung health
  • Enhances muscle performance
  • Maintains power drop
  • Diabetes
  • Immune system
  • Respiratory health
  • Eyes health
  • Skin (Psoriasis, Acne, Eczema)

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[xxx] Dunstan JA, Mori TA, Barden A, Beilin LJ, Taylor AL, Holt PG, Prescott SL. 2003. Fish oil supplementation in pregnancy modifies neonatal allergen-specific immune responses and clinical outcomes in infants at high risk of atopy: a randomized, controlled trial. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology 112(6):1178-1184.

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[xxxix] Mills MD. 1999. The eye in childhood. American Family Physician 60:907-918

[xl] Appel LJ, Miller ER III, Seidler AJ, Whelton PK. Does supplementation of diet with ’fish oil’ reduce blood pressure? A meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials. Arch Intern Med. 1993;153:1429 –1438.

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[xlii] Maes M, Christophe A, Delanghe J, Altamura C, Neels H, Melt-zer HY: Lowered omega3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in serum phospholipids and cholesteryl esters of depressed patients. Psychiatry Res 1999; 85:275–291

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[lii] Kris-Etherton PM, Harris WS, Appel LJ: Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease: new recommendations from the American Heart Association. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2003, 23: 151– 152.

[liii] Kremer, J.M. 2000. n23 Fatty acid supplements in rheumatoid arthritis. Am J Clin Nutr 2000;71(suppl):349S–51S.

[liv] Greg M. Cole * and Sally A. Frautschy. DHA May Prevent Age-Related Dementia. The American Institute of Nutrition (2010) <http://jn.nutrition.org/content/140/4/869>

[lv] Hanebutt F, Demmelmair H, Schiessl B, et al. Long-chain poluunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) transfer across the placenta. Clin Nutr 2008 Oct; 27 (5): 685-93.

[lvi] Helland IC, Smith L, Saarem K, et al. Maternal supplementation with very long-chain n-3 fatty acids during pregnancy and lactation augments children’s IQ at 4 years of age. Pediatrics 2003; 111:39-44.

[lvii] Dunstan JA, Mori TA, Barden A, Beilin LJ, Taylor AL, Holt PG, Prescott SL. 2003. Fish oil supplementation in pregnancy modifies neonatal allergen-specific immune responses and clinical outcomes in infants at high risk of atopy: a randomized, controlled trial. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology 112(6):1178-1184.

[lviii] Robert K. McNamaraa, Susan E. Carlsonb. Role of omega-3 fatty acids in brain development and function: Potential implications for the pathogenesis and prevention of psychopathology. Science Direct 8:07f / W (Jul. 2004) < http://www.tritolonen.fi/files/pdf/McNamara_Carlson.pdf>

[lix] Maes M, Christophe A, Delanghe J, Altamura C, Neels H, Melt-zer HY: Lowered omega3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in serum phospholipids and cholesteryl esters of depressed patients. Psychiatry Res 1999; 85:275–291

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